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of problems. we look at the foreign policy agenda when the all-stars join me after the break. i'm phil mic. i've been fortunate to win on golf's biggest stages. but when joint pain and stiffness from psoriatic arthritis hit, even the smallest things became difficult. i finally understood what serious joint pain is like. i talked to my rheumatologist and he prescribed enbrel. enbrel can help relieve pain, stiffness, and stop joint damage. enbrel may lower your ability to fight infections. serious, sometimes fatal events including infections, tuberculosis, lymphoma, other cancers, nervous system and blood disorders, and allergic reactions have occurred. before starting enbrel, your doctor should test you for tuberculosis and discuss whether you've been to a region you should not start enbrel if you have an infection like the flu tell your doctor if you're prone to infections, haveuts or sores, have had hepatitis b, have been treated for heart failure, or if you have symptoms such as persistent fever, bruising, bleeding, or paleness. [ phil ] get back to the things that matter most. ask your rhe
of beyond the benghazi incident. i think there's been a dearth of discussion around foreign policy, and in some part that's due because the republicans themselves don't have -- have not verbalized or outlined a foreign policy agenda that's measurably different from that which the president is pursuing. i want to draw your attention to an article in the boston globe, an op ed that says basically the idea of a foreign policy doctrine is outmoded. grand strategies are overrated. they are no more likely to guide this nation to noble he was than painful ones. intervention is fervor, no matter the reason, tends to reflect not reality, but advocacy by people with agendas. one of the issues right now is that the president faces a number of shifting puzzle pieces around the globe. does that, in effect, mean that there cannot be an obama doctrine that applies globally? >> i think it's always helpful for a president and an administration to have a foreign policy and a philosophy about how to approach foreign policy, but you are right that even the greatest enunciation of strategy can be impac
relationships on behalf of the president's and the furtherance of american foreign policy. i'll have some questions later on policies and your views, including how you explain to world leaders how you could have been rooting for the boston red sox instead of what the world knows as the new york yankees as the team of the world, but lets me say, mr. chairman, it's been a pleasure working with you and looking forward to continuing to work with you on the issues you have championed over the years. fighting global terrorism, preventing the spread of nuclear pilogical and chemical weapons. fighting for human rights and against hiv/aids around the world. fighting crime, corruption, drug trafficking and stabding up as you always have for the interest of the foreign service around the world. in your new role, should you be confirmed and i know you will, you will be center stage, representing the interests of all of us, from securing our embassies and protecting our overseas personnel to promoting commerce and enhancing cross cultural ties and keeping america secure through cooperation where possi
. chris cillizza, the foreign policy, in many regards, has been run out of the white house, and perhaps even more so because mcdonagh, the deputy of national security director is going to be the next chief of staff. >> right. no reason to think that will change. andrea, look, we don't focus enough on foreign policy, but the challenges, we focus on the domestic challenges for barack obama, and as we talked about, his inaugural speech was very domestically focused. look, we just had elections in israel, john kerry not in the same place benjamin netanyahu is regarding a two-state solution, at least right now. there are huge challenges, iran, there are huge challenges in the foreign policy front that don't get talked about as much, but are clearly things that not only will be difficult for the president and his team to navigate, but will also have a significant say in how this president is viewed by history. >> and, by the way, we just got word that the white house is going to proceed with a nomination of general allen to be the nato supreme allied commander now that he's been cleared by th
surprising and perhaps not surprising many the speech in the last block, but i thought this foreign policy piece was one of the more surprising things he mentioned. insofar as it sounded like obama 1.0, the obama that was elected in 2008, who has since expanded the use of drones and extra judicial killings, who has had a very aggressive national security policy in place. i wondered what that meant, especially against the back drop of what is happening in the middle east, in syria, and algeria, and mali. what was your read on it? >> but has also, to be fair to president obama, ended the iraq war and begun the drive out of the afghanistan war. one of the really interesting things about the second term, we talked in the first segment about all of the issues of medicare and social security. anything there has to go through a republican house. >> right. >> creating obama's foreign policy does not, for the most part, and we can argue about congressional authority, but presidents have wide latitude on foreign policy, and his appointments on the foreign policy side in chuck hagel and to some lesse
in american foreign policy in the late 1940s. if -- >> like when -- >> if there are two people that would get it. if this is a real deal, what you say, with talk radio -- >> i think it is. >> moving on this issue, and i think the bill -- >> let's also keep in mind that the democrats are trying to turn texas blue. there is work afoot to capitalize on the demographic question here. >> jody, this is my question. i feel like we're -- this is a big moment for the republican party in terms of brand and also policy. i haut this was an incredible moment when jim demint is asked about the comments that colin powell made about a dark vein of intolerance, the racism within the republican party, and also republican comments on legitimate rape and this is how jim demint, who is now president or incoming president of the heritage foundation, presumably a leading voice among conservatives, this is his answer. >> do you regret some of the comments about abortion, about rape. again, what colin powell were vailed racist comments from the party. >> david, the fact that we are losing over 3,000 unborn children a
was unfolding. >> right. well, there is the actual foreign policy piece, then there's the partisan ranker. maggie, before this began, we were looking at hillary clinton's approval ratings. 67% favorable, 26% unfavorable, 6% no opinion. we don't know if she's running for office in 2016, right? but certainly, some of this criticism, some of this questioning, is perhaps directing at poking some holes in the clintonian armor, if you will. >> perhaps. i would go there. no, i think that's absolutely right. i think the issue about benghazi, when it initially began, was a way at getting at obama through hillary clinton, right, during the campaign, but it then evolved into something else that was about her for exactly that purpose. if the idea today was to ding her up memorably going into 2016, i don't think that was accomplished. rand paul did what he was supposed to do, it will make his base happy. it will not sway any votes. if i saw correctly, 37% of republicans approve of her. for her, that is not terrible. i mean, she has always been a pretty polarizing figure. she is leaving state departmen
. afghanistan, there's no guarantee of the future. these are -- the foreign policy record, especially as it relates to terrorism, is not much of a record. >> and caryn, you've been covering the foreign policy as well as the domestic policy. this "60 minutes" interview, the joint interview, was pretty extraordinary on the face of it, but as we enter this last week of hillary clinton's tenure, the president is basically saying, you know, thank you, thank you, thank you for everything you've done. >> yeah. and she has been i think in many ways -- there are not a lot of sort of big monumental tangible accomplishments of her tenure as secretary of state. in many ways she was successful as much because of what she represented, but the history of second terms is that foreign policy becomes much more important, that presidents travel more, that they often engage more with the rest of the world, and i think that given the set of events we're looking at overseas, that is very likely to be the case of president obama's second term. foreign policy almost wasn't even almost mentioned in this elect
pass conversation with vice president and director for foreign policy at the brookings institute, martin indyk, on some of the big bets president obama is making during his second term in foreign policy. >>> good monday morning for you on first look. coming up, democrats insist on a single bill and republicans insist they better change or risk further election. >>> a wave of unrest leaves more than 50 dead and a state of emergency in egypt over islamist policy. >>> ice storms and snow headed to the mideast. a possible breakthrough to help migraine sufferers. and the president obama on hillary clinton and the outlook for 2016. >> you guys in the press are incorrigible. i was literally inaugurated four days ago. and you're talking about elections four years from now. >>> it's nice to see you. i'm veronica de la cruz. this week, president obama puts immigration reform front and center on his agenda. on tuesday he will outline his overhaul in a major speech in las vegas, and even a bipartisan group of senators is on board to reform the system that impacts 11 million undocumented peop
of transition for american foreign policy as senator john kerry faces a high-stakes job interview to be the secretary of state. kerry's confirmation hearings were rather cordial hosted by the foreign relations committee which he's led for the past four years. but it was an unexpected moment when the hearings were interrupted by a protester that offered perhaps the most telling revelation about the man and the moment. >> i'm tired of my friends dying. i don't know if they're going to be alive the next day. >> when i first came to washington and testified, i obviously was testifying as part of a group of people who came here to have their voices heard, and that is, above all, what this place is about. people measure what we do. >> kerry's confirmation hearing today comes a day after secretary hillary clinton stood her ground offering a robust defense of her handling of those attacks in benghazi that killed four americans, including ambassador chris stevens. at wednesday's long-awaited hearings on benghazi, clinton took responsibility for security lapses but that obviously was not go
on here, willie? >> they didn't break any new foreign policy ground, that was clear, in terms of the questioning. so then you're left to wonder what was going on there? what was the idea? although it was remarkable to see the two of them sitting together if you thought about where we were five years ago and them saying shame on you and you're likeable enough. >> you're a racist. >> andrea mitchell, am i being too cynical this morning? because these are two people i respect a great deal. >> a great deal. >> well, it was sort of -- as you're pointing out, it was really unusual to see them together. and to see the relationship that they have developed, i think that they have developed a close relationship. i was really intrigued by when he -- when steve kroft asked about what about the staffs, and they acknowledged it took longer for their staffs to get over the hurt and anger after the campaign, and i would say still hasn't happened, exactly. because she has been the most celebrated secretary of state and certainly the most high-profile member of the cabinet. and gets along very
croft was pointing out in the interview, saying they had no major foreign policy accomplishments, major ones, that is, that they could hold high was his question in the first four years. will that change for kerry? will that be different in this second term with hillary clinton gone? >> i think there are some openings for the obama administration that weren't there in the first four years. you know, we're out of iraq. we're going to be out of afghanistan, our troops out of afghanistan at the end of next year. i think there are going to be some foreign policy challenges with iran and syria and libya and who knows where. and maybe a little bit more of an opening for foreign policy. we also know that presidents in their second term, they tend to turn to foreign policy in those final two years when it is so hard to get things through congress. so i would say, you know, and he's got a secretary of state who's very experienced in john kerry and who also has a relationship with barack obama. >> is there anything he can't do now that secretary clinton will be -- again, friday is her last day. w
relationships on behalf of the presidents and the furtherance of american foreign policy. i'll have some questions later on policies and your views, including how you explain to world leaders how you could have been rooting for the boston red sox instead of what the world knows as the new york yankees as the team of the world. but let me say, mr. chairman, it's been a pleasure working with you and continuing to work with you for the issues that you champion over the years. fighting global terrorism, preventing the spread of biological weapons, fighting for human rights against hiv/a.i.d.s. around the world. if your new role, should you be confirmed, and i know you will, your portfolio will be greatly expanded from securing our embassies and protecting our overseas personnel and through cooperation where possible and isolation where necessary as in the case of iran. of course, it goes without saying that you have truly been a world leader in one of the most consequential issues of our time, climate change. it heartens me to know that you will be our voice to the world. whatever challenges
, very close to the president, isn't he? >> reporter: that's right. in a foreign policy capacity he has been. this is someone who's been very much inside president obama's close circle. he's advised him during the troop withdrawal in iraq, the current one going on in afghanistan and he's in a photo that's now become famous. he was in the situation room during the raid on osama bin laden's house. you'll see him sitting next to secretary of state hillary clinton. it goes back mump further than that. he has been here at the white house since the beginning of president obama's first term. in fact, he helped him as he was coming in to the white house and their time together goes all the way back to when president obama was a senator-elect, when he was coming from being a state legislator in illinois to the senate. so all the way back to his time where he first came to washington. he also was a foreign policy adviser, ashleigh, to the former senate majority leader tom daschle. so he has quite a long credential when it comes to foreign policy, but also he'll obviously be dealing as well with d
role in helping the president shape some of the big foreign policy decisions that have come out of this white house, including drawing down the troops in afghanistan, ending the war in iraq, responding to some of the national -- or natural, rather, disasters that have occurred during president obama's tenure, including japan, haiti, and you remember he was pictured in the situation room after the raid on osama bin laden, so this is someone with whom president obama has worked for quite some time. he has a good working relationship with white house staffers, and just a little bit of biographical information, alex. he lives with his wife and three kids in maryland. he is one of 11 kids himself. president obama coming out right now to announce this new appointment, chief of staff dennis mcdonough. >> thank you, kristen. >> thank you. thank you, everybody. please, everybody, have a seat. good afternoon, everybody, and welcome to the announcement of one of the worst kept secrets in washington. as president i rely on an extraordinary team of men and women here at the white house every
's foreign policy position. he sailed he wouldn't pick him as secretary of state because they have a very different philosophy, bill. bill: we'll see if she mentions some of the more fiery hot spots on the globe today, she's been traveling a million miles, isn't that what she said yesterday. >> reporter: we heard a lot about her traveling more than a million miles as secretary of state. those of who who like hillary clinton were applauding her for her service and her going all over the world and others wanted to ask tough questions about benghazi. martha: i see elizabeth war warren at the table there. is she playing a roam? we are seeing new faces in the senate. >> reporter: i think she has an introduction here. do you want to listen in. martha: sure. >> i know will continue in the tradition of john quincy adams and christian herder as great secretaries from the commonwealth of massachusetts. although john learned more about diplomacy overseas and in the senate he'll be the first to tell you that massachusetts is a great teacher of diplomatic skills. whether it was negotiating his way to
. >>> president obama has named foreign policy aid mcdonough as chief of staff. mr. obama calling mcdonough a trusted adviser who serves with integrity. since the president's arrival in washington as a senator. he now becomes the president's fifth chief of staff. >>> it is one of the fastest and most impressive tech turnarounds we've seen in a while. netflix roaring ahead after some said it was practically irrelevant. we're here with a look inside the company you'll see only on nbc bay area. >> netflix was left for dead last year when it subscription rate hike and its botched attempt to spin off another company left its stock price reeling and users unhappy. but the company went back to work and this week delivered very strong results, a jump in both subscriber numbers and profit. enough to send its stock price soaring. the company's ceo admitting it made mistakes in the past but will continue to try new things in the future. >> we're a swing for the fences company. we want to do great things. and you know, occasionally if you swing for the fences, you're going to strike out. and qui
. he's not going to ttckle foreign policy.((ot mcdonough)4 44he talled about hope and change, and people &phad belief in what he would do, but now we have a record. he talked the talk, but doesn't walk the walk.aad ow the nation watches to sse if the president whooinnpiied so puch hope fourryears ago.... phaage.... .... in his econd reporting.) hhw are the roads looking tonnght? 3 toonght?carrie peirce has our trafficcedge report. reeort.mappdot- 883shawanmdot- 695 llbertymdot- 95 n of 195map- the hostage situution mmy be over, but, there are stilll many questions ssrrounding the algerian stand-off... 3 thrown on the ttacks.what pooice say may have caused a man tt put aawoman's life in serious anger. and pleaddng for an organ donor.the rrason one man has taken to the streets. 3 --adblib weaahhr the car on the left was filled up with low detergent gasoline. the car on the right was filled up with bp gasoline with invigorate. which helps clean and protect its engine so it can get a few more miles per tank than the car on the left. go a little farther with bp gasoline with i
of jockbs and what's happening in north africa and foreign policy, at least not yet. where should they make a move? >> if the president is true to his word, he needs to do something about the economy, about job creation. there are more unemployed or underemployed people in this country today than there were when the president first took office. we've seen a 33% increase in spending on welfare programs. the african-american unemployment rate in this country is double the national average. and nothing that the president is talking about right now seems to be geared toward putting those people back to work. >> i want to put some numbers on the screen right now, it's fox news polling that's new and how the people feel about the president now compared with four years ago. 47% disapprove, compared with 16% four years ago and look at the flip-flop in terms of those who approve there on the screen, and 47-65%, the jobs that you're talking about, maybe point a little to that, but there are other things that you've written about in a column. >> absolutely. look, you have a middle class whose incomes
law. he has been co opted but part of that was because the foreign policy was complicity. they welcomed the muslim brotherhood and the white house doing that. we haven't been serious about getting behind executive forces. we were serious about getting behind anti communist parties in the cold war in europe. recreating that would be a much better way to go in my opinion. >> as you look at that part of the world it is volatile. we know terrorists are there. we know right next door the french are fighting in mali to drive out terrorists there. they have already asked for our help. we have a situation in turkey where we put patriot missiles on the ground to help them out they have a civil war next door playing out inside syria. going forward, i mean it sounds like this needs to be a part of the world where we engage but how do we engage without putting our people in harm's way? >> we should be smart about doing it. we have a relatively new u.s. africa command. that's the over riding story of the past couple of months. the nexus of the islamists insurgency in many ways was cen
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foreign policy and hopefully tomorrow in john kerrey's hearing before the senate foreign relations committee we'll get into that because the real issue is the date on obama foreign policies. >> thank you. phil mickelson, tiger woods, lebron jamgs and derek jeter, guess, what they're all supply siders. i'm going to try to explain that to you up next. (announcer) scottrade knows our clients trade and invest their own way. with scottrade's smart text, i can quickly understand my charts, and spend more time trading. their quick trade bar lets my account follow me online so i can react in real-time. plus, my local scottrade office is there to help. because they know i don't trade like everybody. i trade like me. i'm with scottrade. (announcer) scottrade. voted "best investment services company." ♪ i don't wanna be right [ record scratch ] what?! it's not bad for you. it just tastes that way. [ female announcer ] honey nut cheerios cereal -- heart-healthy, whole grain oats. you can't go wrong loving it. excuse me, sir i'm gonna have to ask you to power down your little word game. i thi
this ambitious foreign policy agenda. >> what was hillary clinton's initial reaction when you told her look, they're actually considering you as possibility for secretary of state. >> she didn't believe it. >> reporter: he is one of clinton's closest aides. >> i e-mailed her, i think it was the friday after the election day after hearing it from two reporters. and her reply was, not for a million reasons. >> if she hesitated, why not just say no? >> i think she did, or she came very close, i think the president persuaded her. >> reporter: clinton was quickly confirmed, but how would she get along with the man who defeated her campaign? could she work for him? >> everybody expected there would be a lot of division, secretary of clinton going behind his back. >> reporter: so was there any tension between the people at the top? >> i think everybody has been surprised. >> reporter: surprised that while secretary clinton and president obama have been separated often as she travels the world, they have maintained a unified front. >> and she has spoken of that relationship, you know, once adversearies,
up focusing on foreign policy, maybe more than they intend to, maybe more than their first terms. why is that? >> the main reason probably is when a president comes in for a second term, he usually has about six to eight months to get things through congress. it may seem small, but even lbj in '65, with 61% presidential landslide, more democrats in congress than any other time in the 20th century except for roosevelt, he knew enough about the senate and the house, he said i've got six months because i'm going to be asking democrats and some republicans to cast some risky votes. after a while, they're going to start rebelling because they're going to look to the election next year. foreign policy is something you can do without running to congress for permission ever day. >> ah. it's the can when you can't do other things. >> indeed. >> they're always from history. in terms of the president looking ahead at six to eight months, what they're telegraphing right now from the white house is that the heavy lift they're going to ask for is a variety of measures related to gun violence. becau
choice to carry forward the obama administration's foreign policy, and i urge his speedy confirmation. >> and at her side one of her toughest critics on benghazi. today recounting how he and fellow vietnam veteran john kerry worked together to normalize relations with vietnam in the 1990s. >> helping to establish a relationship with vietnam that serves american interests and values rather than one that remained meyered many mutual resentment and bitterness is one of my proudest accomplishments as a senator. i expect it is one of john's as well. witnessing almost daily his exetch lear statesmanship is one of the highest privileges i've had here. >> kerry's first appearance on the senate foreign relations panel as an activist. some things don't change. >> how do you ask a man to be the last man to die in vietnam? >> i'm tired of -- >> when i first came to washington and testified, i was testifying as part of the group of people who came here to have their voices heard, and that is, above all, what this place is about, so i respect, i think, the woman who was voicing her concerns about t
's behavior. >> it's consistent with what we found out is actually this administration's foreign policy, the foreign policy is, what difference does it make? >> illegal immigration bad for america, and the fact is we have 11 million people in this country more or less that are undocumented and i don't know anyone that's happy about that. >> iranian police first arrested the pastor in 2009 for spreading christianity and abdeane says the iranian government prognosis promises and agreed. and she says she was blind sided by her husband's current arrest, he was arrested for attempting-- >> dead spin.com reported there was no girlfriend and that manti te'o was part after hoax and he was the victim even though he stuck to it even after learning of hoax. >> girl i committed myself to died on september 12th and now i get a call on december 6th and saying that it's a lie and i'm going to be put on national tv later and ask the same questions. what would you do? >> all that and much more ahead, but first, many lawmakers questioning why the u.s. would send 16 highly advanced f-16 fighter jets to eg
white house. he has helped advise president obama on some of his key foreign policy decisions, including drawing down the troops in afghanistan, ending the war in iraq, and also responding to some of the natural disasters that have occurred in recent years, including haiti, and japan. he is someone who has built up a lot of trust here in the white house. you heard that today when president obama talked about him, talked about how much he meant to the staffers here. we should also mention he was pictured in the situation room during the raid on osama bin laden, so this is certainly someone who is very close to the president and will be a key figure moving forward with this white house. andrea. >> thank you so much, kristen welker. david gregory here and pete williams joining us as well. autowe've seen good chiefs of staff and bad. some of the best. jim bakker, ken duberstein, leon panetta in times of trouble. >> howard baker certainly rescuing the ronald reagan second term from don regan, a bad chief of staff by all accounts. what is the pluses and minuses of denis mcdonough. he knows the
in the president's attitude, certainly in his approach to foreign policy. you'll recall from the beginning of administration, the word engagement was, in fact, a guidepost for how we were going to try to deal with adversaries as well as in terms of how you try to deal with resolving conflict. so, i think engagement as such is not new. there's als been a premise to that engagement. it's engagement without illusion. the president has looked at iran as a country that is pursuing a nuclear weapons capability and he's made it clear his objective is to prevent that, not to live with it. his preferred approach is to resolve it through peaceful means, resolve it by engaging with iranians, getting ourselves and others to engage, but to get the iranians to change their objective. the end result may be preferably achieved through diplomacy but the implication is if diplomacy does not work, force may be likely. >> you listen to what the president said in terms of interpretation from israel, couple with what ma hud barack was saying, if that kind of back-channelling doesn't work. are we at odds with is
american foreign policy. but what are the high points? what can she point to to say i did that during tenure as secretary of state? >> the reality is she was trapped in a way, caught between an a cruel and unforgiving world which is not terribly hospitable to big successes, and she didn't have any. on the other hand, she was caught with a foreign policy president, barack obama, who's the most withholding and controlling since richard nixon. he wasn't going to delegate many of the big-ticket items. i think shea made it out of necessity. she identified her own issues. i call them planetary humanism -- women's issues, gend gender issues, social networking, internet freedoms, press freedoms. they're all very important, 21st century issue, but they're not the kind of issues that get you into the secretary of state hall of fame. a very fine secretary of state nonetheless. >> and the benghazi, libya, situation will follow her, yes? >> absolutely. >> yeah. polls show she is one of the most admired women if not the most admired woman in the world. is she the front-runner for the white house in
and foreign policy. you would think we are consumed by constant threats and occupiers. i'm nervous about this and anxious about this and i think it was a striking moment. it gives you a sense of what the cost of trying to maintain this presence and project is. >> and the difficulty of articulating a strategy. >> speaking of costs. and speaking of senator johnson. i don't mean to pick on him. he did ask an interesting question that i believe has never come up in a confirmation hearing. that is what are you going to do about the debt and deficit? >> let's listen to that. >> you utilize your position to work with the president to solve the debt and deficit issue. >> i'm not here to go through the details why we didn't. there was a very, hard line position that prevented us from being able to come to an agreement which we just came to. but we came to it with far lesson the table and far less accomplished than we would have had if we had come to it a year ago >> and that is the most diplomatic answer than we had. >> well, it is telling that this is sort of the default position on anything. >>
on the foreign policy side. that's true. that is certainly a different choice for chief of staff when the economy remains issue number one. the fact of the matter is that jacob lew moving from chief of staff over to the treasury department and joe biden are perfectly capable of managing capitol hill and what needs to be done next in terms of bills and the budget and all of that kind of stuff. i think what makes mcdonough choice so interesting is it's a legacy choice. this is a man who has been at the president's side since the president's national career started as a freshman senator. he was there through the election. he has been at the white house all this time. this is a man whose loyalties to the president and who will protect the president, which is really the number one job of chief of staff. i think it's a very interesting choice and someone that the president trusts fully because now the president is putting together what will be these final years of the obama era and this is a man that he trusts to protect the obama era. >> candy, people might not know this. when the president gets that
foreign policy issues that we're facing out there that didn't get touched. >> you're right, and one vicky mentions legacy and i think it was joe poll lack of breitbart news was the first to notice the words peace in our time a and. >> yes, absolutely. >> and chamberlain and coming back from the munich deal with hitler, and most misbegotten and it slipped by the fact checkers and-- >> nobody noticed and-- >> i did. >> jon: and now newsweek magazine, which is an online only publication, i guess you would call it. the second coming. now, conservatives have long complained that president obama thinks that of himself, but now, cal, they have he' made it official, i guess. >> he was treated the first time around and i think the media put too much faith in politics and government because it reflects their particular ideological bias and they really -- they're setting him up for a no-fail second term. they're not going to hold him accountable and didn't hold him accountable in the first term and afraid of being branded racist and they agree with him. one mentioned al roker embarrassed himself. he
. >> what do you think is the biggest foreign policy success? the 2008 campaign was a tough and bit are race and i will spare you reading some of the things that you said about each other. but, how long did it take to get over that? >> it didn't take long for credit ins rip the joint interview with president obama and secretary of state, hillary clinton, conservatives and liberals alike calling the interview "soft." but we should not be in the least bit surprised. i was surprised. i waited for it in anticipation. here is what i got. a softball, an air ball, i got a marshmellow, i didn't see hard-hitting questions. i got to be surprised. give me one. >> no, this his history, this is why we report a report called "syrupy minutes" with the democrats this is what they do. with mitt romney in the last election cycle, they were hounding him about why no five sons when in the military. this is not a question they have asked president obama why he didn't go in the military. so, this is the same show that broke abu grab or tried to destroy bush with fake national guard records and put these two peopl
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